2nd Annual World Hijab Day: Deuxième Partie

In Awe

Photo taken by Amani Abuhamra

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart’s Camera

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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“Turnin’ Up with tha Soy Sauce”
Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Selfie Nation

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4th Floor Homies

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

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Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Michelle Stewart

Photo taken by Muah

Photo taken by Muah

Jokes, giggles, and friendship at its finest. After volunteering for National Hijab Day I went out to dinner to celebrate a friend’s birthday. It turned out to be a perfect scenario. For the longest time, I was planning to have an experimental day in which I would wear the hijab around campus/dorms and observe people’s expressions or interactions as I approached them. Instead I got to wear my purple weave (or so my very effervescent black friend loves to call it) to the mall, then to a fancy smancy restaurant, and flip it so the world could see.

The day made a huge difference in how I perceive myself as a person and how I wanted others to perceive me. It felt daring, gutsy,…EMPOWERING to walk around with it on. For emphasis, I felt like hot shit. For volunteers it was permissible to take breaks allowing me to walk around and I got a chance to get comfortable with the garb. The only problem with being really modest for the day was the constant havoc that a lengthy skirt wreaked while walking up the stairs. But then again I can never walk without tripping or falling on a regular basis.

There was a mix of emotions running through my head, but for the most part excitement was the one that felt more pronounced among the rest. I felt removed from the lustful eyes of the public but still received looks of curiosity. I was so hoping those same people would approach me and ask questions that way I could educate them.

Also while I felt confident in my endeavors I realized I felt nervous about the reactions that would stir around my peers. The mall was a tease, but that trip to the restaurant was the REAL test. For the most part, I don’t care about how strangers feel about me. However, friends are a completely different story. They give value to your survival in this world. Your parents are more likely to accept your present choices but to find people with no blood bound connection that will always love you does a whole lot more for self-validation.

As you can see it turned out well. They were baffled at first, but have already been exposed to the religious aspect of wearing one. But because of my nervousness some of them did pick up on the shy behavior I presented to them and were a little hesitant to act their usual way. Also because it was only a test I took it off at some point due to accumulating sweat. After that I noticed a little bit more ease among a few (mainly the dudes). That bothered me. I’m just as ever the same. A little bit more reserved, but still the same.

CONCLUSION: People didn’t treat me as differently as I thought they would. Actually, I found that more people- strangers to be exact- stare at me when I wear my hair down (probably due to its length) than with the scarf on. I want to wear one permanently and if I do Insha’Allah my friends will be able to be more comfortable with me wearing it. However, my priorities first need to be in check, my self-confidence needs work, and self-discipline is a necessary practice. If I’m doing this thing I’m doing it right.

This may take a while…

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Hijab Style Inspired by Zukreat

Like every other Hijab tutorials are a must!

Surprise Hijabi

“Crazy Eyes”
Photo taken by Amani Abuhamra

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